Endangered/Threatened Invertebrates

Franklin’s Bumble bee

Franklin’s bumble bee is easily identified by the extended yellow on the anterior top of the thorax that extends behind the wing bases and forms an upside-down U-shape around the central patch of black. This bumble bee has one of the lowest population distributions and is considered very rare. The use of commercial bumble bee colonies to pollinate crops has transmitted a variety of diseases and genetic disorders to native populations, and we have displaced them with our agricultural expansion over the years.

Photo Credit: Center For Food Safety

Mack Rhoten

Dolloff Cave Spider

The Dolloff Cave Spider (Meta dolloff) is a species of spider native to California. It is among the rarest spiders of North America. Until recently, it was known only from the Empire Cave system; a small series of caves near the University of California Santa Cruz campus. Recently a few additional populations have been found in nearby caves in both Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties.

Photo Credit: R.J. Adams

Michael Todea

Glacier Bay Wolf Spider

The Glacier Bay wolf spider (Pardosa diuturna) is a species of spider in the family Lycosidae. It is endemic to Canada and Alaska.

Photo Credit: Bo Zaremba

Michael Todea

Fender’s Blue Butterfly

The Fender’s blue butterfly is a small butterfly with a wingspan of around 1 inch. The wings of the males are a beautiful blue with black on the edges of the wings, and a surrounding white halo. The female butterflies have a more copper-like brown color taking up most of the wings, with the same black and white perimeter. The underside of the wings are a cream-brown color with black dots. The habitat of the Fender’s blue butterfly has been threatened by multiple different forces including fire suppression, roadside maintenance, non-native species, etc. The Fender’s blue butterfly was put on the endangered species list in 2000, but since then there have been conservation sites closely monitoring the butterfly. 
Photo credit: Institute for Applied ecology

Fender’s blue butterfly is a small butterfly with a wingspan of around 1 inch. The wings of the males are a beautiful blue with black on the edges of the wings, and a surrounding white halo. The female butterflies have a more copper-like brown color taking up most of the wings, with the same black and white perimeter. The underside of the wings is a cream-brown color with black dots. The habitat of the Fender’s blue butterfly has been threatened by multiple different forces including fire suppression, roadside maintenance, non-native species, etc. The Fender’s blue butterfly was put on the endangered species list in 2000, but since then there have been conservation sites closely monitoring the butterfly. 

Photo credit: Institute for Applied ecology

Moriah Arnold

Taylor’s Checkerspot Butterfly

The Taylors Checkerspot Butterfly is native to grasslands in the pacific northwest. It is a subspecies of the Edith Checkerspot Butterfly, and has a wingspan of 2.25 inches. Populations have declined due to loss of habitat caused by development, pesticides, and spread of trees and invasive plant species, and there are only a few small, separate populations of the butterflies left.

Image credit: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Melozie Madland

Oregon Silverspot Butterfly

The Oregon silverspot butterfly is an endangered species of Butterfly native to the PNW. The population has declined over recent years due to habitat degridation partially from the wildfires that have striken the PNW each summer.
This butterfly relies on a single plant to continue its survival. The early blue violet.

Image credit: Oregon Zoo

Kelly Eriksen

Vernal Pool Fairy Shrimp

The Vernal Pool Fairy shrimp is an invertebrate that occupies vernal pools, which are temporary wetlands that generally persist during longer periods of rainfall. Due to human activity/urbanization, vernal pools are much less common than they once were. The Shrimp was first designated as a threatened species in 1994.

Photo Credit: Dwight Harvey USFWS

Ben Gregg